Current UK speed limits by road and vehicle type

Updated: Jan 19

Below are the UK national speed limits as they currently stand. We've listed each type of vehicle class and the maximum speeds permitted on each type of road for that class.



UK speed limits for cars, motorbikes, and car-derived vans weighing up to two tonnes fully laden:

• Restricted road: 30mph

• Single carriageway: 60mph

• Dual carriageway: 70mph

• Motorway: 70mph


UK speed limits for cars, motorbikes, and car-derived vans weighing up to two tonnes fully laden:

• Restricted road: 30mph

• Single carriageway: 60mph

• Dual carriageway: 70mph

• Motorway: 70mph


(*Including motorbikes towing a trailer, or vans towing a trailer)


UK speed limits for buses, coaches and minibuses up to 12 metres long and goods vehicles weighing up to 7.5 tonnes:

• Restricted road: 30mph

• Single carriageway: 50mph

• Dual carriageway: 60mph

• Motorway: 70mph



UK speed limits for goods vehicles over 7.5 tonnes in England and Wales:

• Restricted road: 30mph

• Single carriageway: 50mph

• Dual carriageway: 60mph

• Motorway: 60mph


UK speed limits for goods vehicles over 7.5 tonnes in Scotland:

• Restricted road: 30mph

• Single carriageway: 40mph

• Dual carriageway: 50mph

• Motorway: 60mph

What are restricted roads, motorways and dual carriageways?


A restricted road is the technical name for roads that are in built up areas. In these busy situations, it can sometimes be difficult to work out the speed limit is. However, if you can't see any speed limit signs, then a good rule of thumb to follow is that if there are buildings and street lights lining the road, then the speed limit is 30mph. However, if the posted speed limit is higher than 30mph, then the different zone will be signified by the standard circular speed limit signs at the start of the zone, then smaller repeater signs will be placed on lamp posts or individual posts at regular intervals within the zone.

If the road doesn't have a physical divider between the two opposing streams of traffic then this is a single carriageway road. They can be formed of any number of variations from a single lane country road with passing places to a wide five-lane road with something called a tidal flow for the centre lane, which is designed to operate in both directions to ease traffic congestion at peak times.


What is a smart motorway?


The other highway variant is the dual carriageway. These use a divider - either a grass verge or something more substantial, such as metal armco or concrete barriers. In very rare circumstances (often at the start of a multi-lane road) they can have single lanes in both directions, but more often they will have at least two lanes for each direction of traffic. Motorways are an evolution of the dual carriageway, and due to their higher speeds there are restrictions on the type of vehicles that can use them, with the slowest road users banned from them.